KHROMA (Cláudio Carneyro) – red. viola & piano

Project Description

Khroma
reduction for viola and piano
[movements I e III]

  • composition date (Carneyro):
    • original version for viola and piano [only slow movement]: 1954
    • extended version [in three movements] for viola and orchestra: 1962
  • reduction for viola and piano (Luís Carvalho): 2015
  • duration: ca. 20 min.

In 1954 Cláudio Carneyro (1895-1963) conceived a work for viola and piano dedicated to the renowned Belgian violist and pedagogue François Broos (1903-2002), who long lived in Portugal. Entitled Khroma, a Greek word alluding to the concept of “colour/colourful”, this piece represents one of the first, if not the very first case of dodecaphonic composition by a Portuguese composer (although in this case, the twelve-tone system is not strictly followed). However, as soon as 1955, Carneyro devises also a version of this piece (by then a mere slow and meditative movement of six minutes in length, woven in extreme chromaticism) for viola and orchestra, which Broos premieres that same year in Lisbon. Some years later (1962) the composer decides to expand further the work, conceiving two extra movements meant to precede and succeed the original Khroma movement, thus creating a concertante work in three movements of markedly neoclassical architecture, despite the bold and modern musical language. This new longer version was planned only in orchestral version (solo viola, accompanied by orchestra), and remained unheard and largely unknown for over half a century, until it was finally posthumously premiered in 2014, within the scope of the 42nd International Viola Congress in Porto, at which occasion it was played by Portuguese violist Pedro Meireles. Having been myself the conductor of this World premiere, it became only evident that it should also be I to create a version for viola and piano of the two new movements of Khroma, in an effort to provide a document more suitable for individual study and academic usage. My new versions of the first and third movements for viola & piano, should therefore be interwoven with Carneyro’s original rendition for viola & piano of the slow Khroma movement, thereby allowing the presentation of the concerteante version in three movements, in its entirety.
I dedicate this version for viola & piano to all the Portuguese violists, who relentlessly advocate for this instrument so often unfairly neglected!

 

Luís Carvalho
(December/2015)


buy sheet music:
[available soon]

 

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